Month: April 2015

Buried forests and ghost ships: Geoarchaeology of the Black and Baltic Sea Coasts by Ilya Buynevich of Temple University

IVB-Est new_13990

Please join us for the next seminar series on April 28, 2015 at 12:30pm in Beach Hall room 233.  Ilya Buynevich from Temple University will be presenting “Buried forests and ghost ships: Geoarchaeology of the Black and Baltic Sea Coasts.”

Students and faculty are invited to attend.  Snacks will be served.

 

 

Career Day with UConn Geosciences Alumni

Career Day with UConn Alumni

PLEASE JOIN US in Beach 233 

FOR A CAREER PANEL on April 21, 2015

FEATURING UCONN ALUMNI

Presentations, Q&A, Lunch

 
thomasMargaret A. ThomasDr. Thomas is the State Geologist for the State of Connecticut Geological Survey Office.
binkhorstGordon BinkhorstDr. Binkhorst is a Hydrogeologist with Alta Environmental, Inc., in Colchester, CT 
asherPranati AsherDr. Asher is the Manager of Education and Public Outreach programs for the American Geophysical Union (AGU) 

“From isotopes to mountain slopes: Unraveling the sedimentary response to tectonics and surface processes in the Patagonian Andes” with Julie Fosdick

Fosdick_graphic PLEASE JOIN US!  

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015 12:30PM BEACH HALL 233

Julie’s research addresses the interactions between crustal deformation, exhumation, and basin evolution during mountain-building. She is particularly interested in understanding the long-term evolution of orogenic belts during their growth and denudation as recorded in the sedimentary record. Julie draws upon numerous field-based, analytical, and modeling tools that include basin analysis, low–temperature thermochronology, and structural geology

Getting blood from a stone: Animation, X-rays, and dinosaur track diversity by Stephen Gatesy, Brown University

gatesy_action

Please join us!  Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 12:30pm in Beach Hall 233 for our next Seminar Series presentation by Stpehen Gatesy of Brown University.

Stephen Gatesy’s background is in biology, paleontology, and art. He has a BA from Colgate University, was the Watson Fellow where he studied dinosaurs in European museums, and received his Ph.D. from Harvard, where his research featured X-ray and muscle activity studies of alligators and birds to explore the evolution of hind limb function in bipedal, meat-eating dinosaurs (theropods).

Stephen Gatesy’s research uses 3-D animation tools to reconstruct dinosaur foot movements based on fossil tracks, to measure skeletal motion in walking and flying birds, and to find new ways to study locomotor evolution.

 

New Course Names and Catalog Descriptions for Introductory GSCI Courses

NEW COURSE NAMES AND CATALOG DESCRIPTIONS FOR INTRODUCTORY GSCI COURSES

Approved by University Senate on April 13, 2015

Note:  These changes were not approved in time for registration for Fall 2015, but will almost certainly be approved by the time of enrollment for Fall 2015.  They will be taught using the new titles below, though your transcript will reflect the old titles.

  1. Dinosaurs, Extinctions, and Environmental Catastrophes

Three credits. Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1050, 1051, 1055, or 1070. Students who complete both GSCI 1010 and GSCI 1052 may request that GSCI 1010 be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course.

A reconstruction of the Mesozoic world of the dinosaurs based on paleontological and geological evidence. Past and present environmental catastrophes leading to mass extinctions and changes in biodiversity. Fundamental concepts of geology, stratigraphy, historical geology, and paleoclimatology. CA 3.

  1. Earth’s Dynamic Environment

Four credits. Three class periods and one 3-hour laboratory period. Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1010, 1051, 1055, or 1070.

Origin and history of planet Earth, emphasizing how rock, air, water, and life interact at different scales to produce the earth’s crust, landforms, life systems, natural resources, catastrophes, and climatic regimes. Provides a scientific context for human-induced global change. A fee of $10 is charged for this course. CA 3-LAB.

 

  1. Earth’s Dynamic Environment (Lecture)

Three credits. Three class periods. Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1010, 1050, 1055, or 1070. Students who complete both GSCI 1051 and 1052 may request that GSCI 1051 be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course.

Origin and history of planet Earth, emphasizing how rock, air, water, and life interact at different scales to produce the earth’s crust, landforms, life systems, natural resources, catastrophes, and climatic regimes. Provides a scientific context for human-induced global change. CA 3.

 

  1. Earth’s Dynamic Environment (Laboratory)

One credit. Prerequisite or corequisite: GSCI 1010 or GSCI 1051 or GSCI 1055 or GSCI 1070. Not open to students who have passed GSCI 1050. Students who complete both GSCI 1052 and one of GSCI 1010, 1051, 1055 or 1070 may request that the prerequisite be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course.

Laboratory complement to GSCI 1010, 1051, 1055, and 1070, . Provides an opportunity to work with specimens (minerals, fossils, rocks), terrain images, maps, physical models, and simulation experiments. Includes local field trips. A fee of $10 is charged for this course.

 

1055 Geoscience and the American Landscape

(Previously offered as SCI 1051).  Three credits. Prerequisite: Open only to Honors students. Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1010, 1050, 1051, 1070. Students who complete both GSCI 1055 and GSCI 1052 may request that GSCI 1055 be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course.

An Honors Core course. Foundation course in geology linked to the American Landscape through readings from American history and literature. CA 3.

 

  1. Natural Disasters and Environmental Change

(Also offered as GEOG 1070.) Three credits. Not open for credit to students who have passed GSCI 1010, 1050, 1051, 1055. Students who complete both GSCI 1070 and GSCI 1052 may request that GSCI 1070 be converted to a CA 3 Laboratory course.

Climate change, global warming, natural hazards, earth surface processes, and the impact these have on populations now and in the past. CA 3.